School of Recreation, Health, and Tourism - George Mason University
Graduate School of Education - George Mason University

Our Graduate School of Education is the alma mater for one third of teachers and administrators in Northern Virginia’s world-class school systems. Each year, more than 3,000 graduate students enroll in our innovative academic programs, which include advanced study for teachers and school leaders, instructional design and technology, and a renowned PhD in Education program that is among the largest in the country.

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School of Recreation, Health, and Tourism - George Mason University

The School of Recreation, Health, and Tourism (SRHT) offers exciting, career-ready majors in dynamic fields such as athletic training, tourism and events management, health and physical education, kinesiology, sport management, and recreation management. SRHT features renowned faculty, cutting-edge research, six laboratories and centers, and a diverse student body of more than 1,000 undergraduate and graduate students each year. Each major requires one or more internship or clinical experiences, ensuring that students graduate not just with a transcript but with a resume that demonstrates their professional aptitude and skills.

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Our faculty are captivating teachers and active researchers and our students frequently partner with them on original research projects that are presented at regional and national conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals.

The classes in the EFHP MS program are offered in both face-to-face and distance learning (online) formats. The majority of the face-to-face classes are held on Mason’s Science and Technology Campus, with some face-to-face classes are held on Mason’s Fairfax campus. All students are required to complete core courses. Students must also complete elective courses and a capstone thesis or research project. Students may complete the program on a full-time or part-time basis.

Required Core Courses (15 credit hours)

Advanced Practitioner Concentration (APRC) Full Time Cohort

Research Project or Thesis Option including EFHP 598 Special Topics

Students must take:

And either:

My overall experience in the MS EFHP Program and Mason can be described with two words, challenging yet rewarding. I was forced to expand my knowledge and my thinking to because a more research-savvy practitioner which has made me a better athletic trainer and a better teacher today.

Total: 36 credits

NOTES

In the Thesis Option, students complete EFHP 598 (3 credits) and EFHP 799 (3 credits). Students develop independent research proposals. Then, in consultation with the EFHP Graduate Coordinator, students select two additional faculty members to form a three-member thesis committee. One committee member may be selected from faculty outside of the program. Students may not register for thesis credit until the student’s thesis committee and the EFHP Graduate Coordinator have approved a proposal. Once the committee approves the proposal, students register for thesis credit and conduct their independent research projects.

In the Research Project Option, students complete EFHP 598 (3 credits) and EFHP 798 (3 credits). In the special topics course, students conduct a directed research project with an EFHP faculty member that is aligned with the faculty member’s research agenda. Then, in the project course, students work with the EFHP faculty member to develop a paper and presentation in the format of submission to a peer-reviewed journal and presentation at professional conferences, respectively.

Hannah Stone (left) and Mary Chabolla (middle), Master Students in Exercise, Fitness, and Health Promotion work with Prince William County high school students on the sidelines through the ACHIEVES Project. Photo by Evan Cantwell/Creative Services/George Mason University.

Hannah Stone (left) and Mary Chabolla (middle), Master Students in Exercise, Fitness, and Health Promotion work with Prince William County high school students on the sidelines through the ACHIEVES Project. Photo by Evan Cantwell/Creative Services/George Mason University.